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Posts Tagged ‘white tip sharks’

Coral Gardens and Thresher Sharks

Saturday, January 26th, 2013

The Philippines were an afterthought for me.  I was trying to figure out where I was going from Malaysia, and I wanted to do some good diving.  Several people had suggested the Philippines for its beautiful beaches and pristine diving, so I headed there after my short visit to Sumatra.  There are over 7000 islands in the Filipino archipelago, so it took some research to decide where to go.  When I discovered Apo Island in the south, I decided to concentrate on that area, flying into Dumaguete on Negros, and flying out of Cebu City on Cebu.

My first stop was the coastal town of Dauin, 25 minutes south of Dumaguete.  Here I stayed at Liquid Dumaguete, a dive resort I would recommend to anyone heading to the area, and with whom I dove Apo Island.  Apo is an amazing experience, diving the most beautiful coral gardens I’ve ever seen.  Coming from Key West where we are having problems with our corStormy day at Liquid Dumagueteal, this was a great treat.  Nature is an incredible thing.   The varieties of both hard and soft coral were countless, and encompassed all the colors of the rainbow in shade and vibrancy.  It is amazing how each variety of clownfish resided in an anemone of a similar color; how the coral resembled land vegetables like broccoli, cauliflower, and lettuce; how certain tropicals camouflaged to their surroundings and others paraded their differences.  If all the reefs of the world were as healthy as this one, there would be no question to why we have to protect them to share with future generations.  They are inspiring.   I wanted to dive here a second time, but several days of windy weather due to a tropical depression kept me from getting there a second time.  This was a little disappointing, but just means I’ll have to try to get back there again.

From here, I took the ferry to Panglao, a small island off the southwest coast of the island of Bohol.   The island to dive here is called Balicasag and is known for green turtles.  On one dive I saw no less then 12 turtles.  There are also several species of frogfish here, large black ones, large white ones, and small yellow ones with brown splotches.  Frogfish have really funny faces, fCrystal Clear at Balicasagat bodies, and short fins for their size.  There are many species of nudibranches here, too, which are one of the primary small things people look for when diving in this part of the world.  I’d never heard of them back home, but I think they must exist in the Caribbean, as well.  While the diving here was very good, I was not a fan of Alona Beach, where I stayed.  It was very touristy, with few backpackers and lots of Germans and Russians.  So, I didn’t stay for long.  Did the dives one day, and then the next toured the main island of Bohol, famous for the Chocolate Hills, a geological formation of rolling hills which are unique and beautiful, and for Tarsiers, the smallest primate in the world which only reside here.  These little monkeys are tiny and cute and can sit in the palm of one’s hand.  They have huge eyes which assist them in finding food at night and they sleep most of the day.   Being territorial, they return to the same tree each night after eating and spend the day there.

From here I spent the day traveling, two ferries and one bus, to the island of Malapascua off the northern coast of Cebu.  I am a fan of Malapascua.  It is a small island of 8000 residents, with no cars, and little tourist build up.  The A Colorful Home people of the Philippines are known for their friendliness, and the small town feel of Malapascua makes it apparent.  I really liked that I could walk from the southernmost part of the island to the northernmost in around 30 minutes.  One thing that I noticed all throughout the Philippines was that even the smallest hovel of a house had a pristine yard and beautiful garden.  Filipinos are very proud of their property and it shows as they are adorned with a variety of flowering plants and orchids.  This made walking through the villages very pleasant, in addition to the fact that the children wanted to talk and most people said hello with smiling faces.  And it wasn’t only the locals who were friendly here, but the tourists were, too.  It was very easy to meet people to pass the time with.

As for the diving in Malapascua, this is one of two places in the world wherWall Arte Thresher sharks reside.  These sharks are known for their long tails which they thrash through schools of fish to stun them before feeding.  Their other physical characteristics include small mouths and big black eyes.  They are very graceful in the water.  The reef here is also known for manta rays, white-tip sharks, and nudibranches, but by far one of the most impressive things I saw was a pair of Spanish dancers mating.  They are a large species of sea slug with ruffled edges, and they look like they are dancing when they swim.  Other sea critters were sea snakes, squid, and lots of fish.

My blog wouldn’t be complete without a paragraph on food.  While lots of people told me the food was not good in the Philippines, this was not my experience.  The fish was outstanding, so incredibly fresh and the main ingredient in kinilaw (filipino ceviche) and sinigang (a flavorful soup loaded with fish and veggies); the curries were fantastic, made from fresh graThe Best Fish Curry Everted coconut; and because of the Spanish and American influence, the cookies and breads were almost like home.

While I had an amazing time in the Philippines, I wished I’d had an endless budget for diving.  I certainly could have dove a lot more than I did, and would love to return to do that in the future.  The one thing that made it easier to leave was that my next stop was Sydney, where Dore is currently residing and my mom was coming through on a tour.  I was really looking forward to seeing both of them, to being in the presence of people I love for a short time.   For pictures of the Philippines, click here.

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